Make One Change October 2018

October’s change was another packet-reading exercise! We are reducing added sugar in our diets with 2 steps:

  1. Check the ingredients on the package. You’re looking for sugar, or any of it’s 61 variations (listed below)
  2. If you spot any added sugar, head over to the nutrition label, and check that it makes up less that 5% of the total nutritional value of the product (5g per 100g)

The following list is from Sugar Science:

61 Names for Sugar

  • Agave nectar
  • Barbados sugar
  • Barley malt
  • Barley malt syrup
  • Beet sugar
  • Brown sugar
  • Buttered syrup
  • Cane juice
  • Cane juice crystals
  • Cane sugar
  • Caramel
  • Carob syrup
  • Castor sugar
  • Coconut palm sugar
  • Coconut sugar
  • Confectioner’s sugar
  • Corn sweetener
  • Corn syrup
  • Corn syrup solids
  • Date sugar
  • Dehydrated cane juice
  • Demerara sugar
  • Dextrin
  • Dextrose
  • Evaporated cane juice
  • Free-flowing brown sugars
  • Fructose
  • Fruit juice
  • Fruit juice concentrate
  • Glucose
  • Glucose solids
  • Golden sugar
  • Golden syrup
  • Grape sugar
  • HFCS (High-Fructose Corn Syrup)
  • Honey
  • Icing sugar
  • Invert sugar
  • Malt syrup
  • Maltodextrin
  • Maltol
  • Maltose
  • Mannose
  • Maple syrup
  • Molasses
  • Muscovado
  • Palm sugar
  • Panocha
  • Powdered sugar
  • Raw sugar
  • Refiner’s syrup
  • Rice syrup
  • Saccharose
  • Sorghum Syrup
  • Sucrose
  • Sugar (granulated)
  • Sweet Sorghum
  • Syrup
  • Treacle
  • Turbinado sugar
  • Yellow sugar

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October Change… Avoid ADDED sugar. As per usual, we will explore why throughout this whole month. For today, you're reading packets in 2 steps: 1) check the "ingredients" of everything in your cupboards and fridge, and everything you buy from now on. If you see sugar, or one of it's hundreds of alternative names, move on the Step 2 (more on names later, for now, look for words ending in "ose", like dextrose) 2) if there's more than 5% sugar in the nutritional information table, toss it out (more than 5g per 100g).. Note: we are not looking at naturally occurring sugars, only added. If something has no added sugars but is 20% in the nutritional content, it's likely to come from a whole ingredient (like a banana) and is therefore exempt from this process. #makeonechangeoct18

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The internet can be evil. But it is also such a great opportunity to learn! Just be discerning about who you're reading! #Repost @thenaturalvillage • • • • • 🙌🏼 C O N S C I O U S N E S S 💚 Love seeing how humans are becoming more conscious about their lifestyle, everyday choices and our one and only planet 🌏 #happyfriday #consciousliving #zerowaste #livinglifenaturally #sustainableliving #thenaturalvillage #toxinfree #thereisnoplanetb #ecofriendly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . #beconscious #ecoliving #eco #sustainableliving #sustainablefashion #sustainability #ecofriendly #environmentalist #ethicalfashion #ethicalstyle #ethicalliving #ethicalhome #naturallife #naturalliving #organiclife #organic #organicskincare #toxinfreebeauty #toxinfreeliving #fairtrade #organicliving

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Why we have to learn how to read packets. Because what they say a product is, isn't always the truth… #Repost @teamgoodness • • • • • What is in your jar of Peanut Butter? Although many PB brands claim to have "no artificial colours, flavours or preservatives" if you carefully read the nutrition label you'll find they add other ingredients to alter the taste and texture. Our Organic Peanut Butter is 100% natural, and tends to need a quick stir before using to blend the natural oils back in, which separate when sitting – this is only because it contains no nasty additives! We think our purely-peanuts Organic Peanut Butter tastes absolutely delicious without the all of the added salt, sugar and oils. 🥜🥜 Which one would you prefer?

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Now we know sugar is bad for us, but we still think of sugar as only in "junk" food like these doughnuts… the reality is that sugar is in EVERYTHING from your favorite cereal to the sushi roll you just purchased for lunch. For this reason you have to educate yourself on reading nutrition labels. It's not good enough to take the marketers word for it that some thing is "healthy", THEY'RE LYING!! Remember step 1) look at ingredients for sugar (any version) and step 2) make sure it's less than 5g per 100 or don't buy it! If you need more motivation to avoid added sugar, here's a great summary from @webmd https://www.webmd.com/diet/features/how-sugar-affects-your-body And FYI, when they say it "could lead to diabetes", they don't mean in old age… kids as young as 5 years old are presenting with prediabetic markers in countries such as Mexico with high added sugar intake… 📷 @pexels #makeonechangeoct18 #justeatrealfood #makehealthynormal

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So, it's question time! How did you go? What do you need help with? Out if interest, have you checked every packet for foods that go in your child's lunchbox? I feel like we ought to control what they eat while we can, so that healthy habits are "normalised" and will always be their fallback when they grow up and we no longer control their foods. Having said that, don't expect it to happen overnight. A great tip I learned from @wholesome_child is the art of grading. For example, if your kids eat flavoured yoghurt, you checked it and it has too much sugar, but they won't eat plain yoghurt. Simply mix 1T plain yoghurt into the usual yoghurt and increase gradually until they'll eat the plain stuff, voila! #makeonechangeoct18

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  1. […] OCTOBER 2018: Only buy packaged foods with less than 5g sugar per 100g. […]

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