Make One Change May 2019: < 3g salt (or 400mg sodium) per 100g

This month we returned to reading packets, which we are already reading when searching for preservatives and sugar from previous changes. This month we are reducing salt – but only in packaged foods. You will read below the whopping stats on processed foods and salt, and if you’re making your own food with a good quality salt, you are probably not overeating it!

View this post on Instagram

More gold from @heartfoundationau "If you do eat packaged foods try ‘No Salt’, ‘Low Salt’, or ‘Reduced Salt’ varieties. When looking at the Nutrition Information Panel (NIP) try to avoid products with more than 400mg of sodium per 100g. The best options are products with less than 120mg sodium per 100g." Why does it matter? Because it's not "just" high blood pressure (which alone is enough to kill you), high salt intake impacts the body and your health in many ways and is linked to conditions other than high blood pressure such as: heart failure/heart attack kidney problems and kidney stones oedema (fluid retention) stroke left ventricular hypertrophy (thickening of heart muscle) osteoporosis. Full article: https://www.heartfoundation.org.au/healthy-eating/food-and-nutrition/salt #makeonechangemay19

A post shared by Make One Change (@make_one_change) on

View this post on Instagram

I reposted this because of the statistic in the top left corner. 65% of our salt intake comes from the supermarket or convenience store… in the form of PACKAGED foods. It's this reason why we are concentrating on reading packets. If you've participated in this program from the start, you're already screening for preservates, and replacing products with more than 5% sugar. Salt is just the next line on the nutritient label! #makeonechangemay19 #Repost @achievingabetteru • • • • • WELLNESS WEDNESDAY: Yesterday, I had items that may have contained more salt that I should have consumed. This morning woke up, swollen and inflamed. Had to postpone my workout for later today. Today's topic goes over the importance to read labels and look for hidden sources of salt because of all the potential medical illnesses resulting from too much salt in diet. Himalayan salt is a better alternative. #reducesalt #hearthealthy #reducebloating #himalayansalt

A post shared by Make One Change (@make_one_change) on

View this post on Instagram

What @fadfreenutrition said • • • • • Having high blood pressure increases your risk of coronary heart disease and stroke. . Research has consistently shown that sodium (salt) intake is directly associated with blood pressure. It is estimated that a universal reduction of salt intake of approximately 3.75g (1.5g sodium) would lead to a 16% reduction of deaths from heart disease and a 22% reduction of deaths from stroke. . The frightening thing is that high blood pressure is often symptom-free and many people don’t realise they are at risk. . The current NHS guidelines are that adults should eat no more than 6g per day (2.4g sodium) which equates to around one teaspoon. . The maximum amounts recommended for children are age-dependent, but in pre-schoolers aged 1-3 it is as little as 2g salt (0.8g sodium) per day, and babies under 1 should have no more than 1g salt because their kidneys are not developed sufficiently to process it. . Of course, to reduce your salt intake you need to avoid high salt products like stock cubes, bacon, salami, pickles, prawns, yeast extract, salted nuts, particularly for babies. Also try to get into the habit of not adding salt to your cooking. . However, many people are less aware that many processed foods that they eat every day have high salt content. These are foods like bread, ready meals, soup, breakfast cereals, sausages, pasta sauces, baked beans and tomato sauce. This varies from brand to brand, so you need to check labels of these types of products. Bear in mind that even if bread or breakfast cereal has a moderate salt content, you can still consume too much salt if you eat large amounts of it, or eat it very frequently (e.g. kids having mountains of toast for breakfast, lunch and bedtime snack). . If you’re label checking, don’t get confused by the difference between salt and sodium. Some food labels only state sodium content so to convert from sodium to salt you need to multiply by 2.5. . I’ll be giving some practical tips about how to reduce your salt intake so watch this space. . Photo: @jason_tuinstra #SaltAwarenessWeek #salt #sodium #highbloodpressure #coronaryheartdisease #heartdisease #stroke #reducesaltinta

A post shared by Make One Change (@make_one_change) on

 

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *